WWYD?

Check the scenario:

A student has call one Saturday night and is scheduled to get off at 7 a.m. on Sunday.  He tells his team members not to come in on Sunday to do patient rounds – he’ll do them since he’ll already be at the hospital.  Call was rough, when 7 a.m. hits he goes to the house and does not go check the patients.  A certain education administrator pulls his professionalism points – an all or nothing grade worth 10% of his grade.  Said student comes and gets all jazzy with the ed admin saying he only did it once, that’s not fair, there’s nothing in the syllabus about taking points if one doesn’t go see patients (WTH????), etc., etc.  He refuses to admit that he should’ve gone to see the patients.  Ed admin refuses to change his grade – tells him to write an appeal if he truly feels he was in the right.  Ed admin goes to the house.  Thinks about the fact that the student is one of her favorites and with the exception of the above scenario he did really well on surgery rotation.  Ed admin thinks about all of the times in her life when grace and mercy have been shown her and thinks perhaps she should extend the same to the student.

What would you do internets?  Let the student keep his zero – dropping his final grade down a whole letter grade or give him – and every other student (maybe 3) whose professionalism points were pulled this year -their points back and call it a day?

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9 thoughts on “WWYD?

    • The other students don’t have anything to do with this scenario. I just figured that if I gave him a pass, the other students might as well get one too.

      I refuse to click on that link until I’ve made my decision!!! I REFUSE!!!

  1. It partly depends what the syllabus DOES say about professionalism. Does it encompass your duties and following them? Knowing when to ask for help? The humility thing is also a big one. You REALLY feel okay with not showing up?? What would have happened if one of the patients coded and a doctor needed to be around to handle the situation? Do you think your greater responsibility is to your sleep or your patients who are counting on you when you didn’t HAVE to take this upon yourself?

    This is a learning opportunity for this student and I’ve decided after saying all that, he/she deserves to lose all points. He/she is used to getting his/her way through argument & saying it’s not fair. When someone DIES because of your negligence or something that could’ve been prevented is not and you get sued for malpractice, which would you rather have? The points or some professionalism, lower malpractice insurance & a license to practice medicine?

      • Courtney says:

        …what Jameil said. I’m extremely sympathetic to students because I am one, but in this case, all professionalism points should be lost; primarily because of the possible outcomes. In other fields, maybe the grade could be salvaged BUT in the case of healthcare and people’s lives, it’s not an option.

  2. Lisa says:

    He needs to lose his points. All of them. Regardless of whether he’s your favorite or not, he was irresponsible to the point where a life could have been lost. Why didn’t he at least call the folks who were scheduled to do rounds and let them know? His total disregard and subsequent arrogance as to why he shouldn’t lose points seals the deal for me. Better he learn this lesson now. And thank God that the worst that is being lost is 10 points.

    • Jazz says:

      he needs to lose the points . I was always taught that your word is your bond . He promised that he would check on the patients , so he should have done that . He shouldnt have said that he would check on the patients . Fair is fair , he should not get his points back , especially since he had such an entitlement attitude

  3. If no one else in his cohort experienced a loss of points in the same area, then I may have some mercy. If someone had lost points earlier- then he’d have to loose. Can’t play favorites….prior cases set the precedent for “punishment”.

    • I know I’m late but I agree with Aly in Va. As an instructor I’ve found that if you start finding reasons to “bend” then students will find reasons to break. Just my opinion.

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